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Key to Boletus in North America (Page Nine)

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[Pore surface not red or orange; pore surface not bruising blue to greenish blue; cut flesh not staining blue to bluish on exposure; found east of the Rocky Mountains, or in Texas; mature pore surface and/or spore print with olive shades; stem not reticulate.]


Note: This key is in bad need of revision. The non-dichotomous format is annoying and, with the hindsight of a few years, I see many areas that require different emphasis, fleshing out, paring down, and so on. Don't hold your breath waiting, but I will eventually revise the key completely.


  • Growing from the puffball Scleroderma citrinum. (1/2)

    Boletus parasiticus

  • Not as above. (2/2)

      > Stem with scabers, reminiscent of Leccinum. (1/2)

        ° Cap slimy, smooth or wrinkled, yellow to brownish yellow or orangish (sometimes olive with an orange center); pore surface yellow becoming greenish, sometimes bruising brownish; stem white, yellowish, or pinkish, with yellow scabers that darken to reddish in age; flesh white to pale yellow, not staining on exposure; cap bright red with ammonia; spores 13-17 µ long; found in mixed woods; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (1/4)

        Boletus longicurvipes

        ° Cap dry, smooth or finely velvety, olive brown to reddish brown; pore surface yellow at first, soon orange or brownish orange, bruising reddish; stem yellowish, with reddish brown scabers; flesh pale yellow, staining reddish on exposure; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 10-16 µ long; found in mixed woods; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (2/4)

        Boletus morrisii

        ° Cap slimy, wrinkled, reddish brown; pore surface yellow, not bruising; stem yellowish, with reddish scabers; flesh yellow, not staining on exposure; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 17-21 µ long; found under conifers or hardwoods; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (3/4)

        Boletus rubropunctus

        ° Cap slimy, very wrinkled, orange-brown; pore surface white to pale yellow becoming olive, not bruising; stem whitish to brownish, with white scabers that do not darken in age; flesh white, staining pink on exposure; cap bright red with ammonia; spores 14-19 µ long; found under oak; known only from western New York. (4/4)

        Boletus viscidocorrugis

      > Stem without scabers. (2/2)

        ° Bright yellow, golden yellow, or orange shades present and conspicuous on cap. (1/2)

          ~ Cap dry, sub-velvety, orange to yellowish or brownish yellow; pore surface yellow, sometimes bruising brownish orange; stem smooth and dry, yellow to orange with tawny streaks; flesh yellow, darkening on exposure; cap negative with ammonia; spores 9.5-12 µ long; found in mixed woods; southern in distribution. (1/5)

          Boletus aurantiosplendens

          ~ Cap dry, smooth, honey yellow to bright yellow; pore surface yellow becoming olive, not bruising; stem fairly smooth, dry, yellow; flesh yellow, not staining on exposure; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 10-14 µ long; found under oaks; southern in distribution. (2/5)

          Boletus aureissimus

          ~ Cap dry, dusted at first, cracking in age, bright orange-yellow; pore surface yellow to orange, becoming olive, not bruising; stem dusted but later smooth, orange-yellow; flesh white, not staining on exposure; cap flashing faintly bluish, then orange or reddish brown with ammonia; spores 8-12 µ long; found under hardwoods; widely distributed east of the Rockies. "Handling this bolete stains fingers yellow" (Bessette, 95). (3/5)

          Boletus auriflammeus

          ~ Cap slimy, smooth, bright yellow to orange-yellow; pore surface white or pale yellow, not bruising; stem fairly smooth, slimy, yellow; flesh white, not staining on exposure; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 9.5-17 µ long; found in mixed woods; widely distributed east of the Rockies. Reminiscent of some Suillus species. (4/5)

          Boletus curtisii

          ~ Cap dry, somewhat scaly and powdery, golden yellow to orange-yellow; pore surface yellow at first, soon reddish brown, not bruising; stem powdery or fairly smooth, dry, yellow with red tinges; flesh yellow, usually bluing on exposure; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 6-9 µ long; found in mixed woods, sometimes fruiting from wood; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (5/5)

          Boletus hemichrysus

        ° Bright yellow shades absent from cap or inconspicuous (though possibly present on the pore surface and/or stem). (2/2)

          ~ Easily recognized species. (1/2)

            * Typically growing in clusters of two or more; stems smooth, usually bulbous, with fused, pointed bases; cap dry, brown to reddish brown; pore surface bright to dull yellow, not bruising; cap flashing green, then red or orange with ammonia; spores 8-11 µ long; under hardwoods. (1/3)

            Boletus innixus

            * Cap dry or sticky, conspicuously wrinkled, reddish brown; pore surface yellow, not bruising (but occasionally bruising faintly bluish); flesh white, not staining on exposure (sometimes bluing faintly); cap flashing green, then olive brown with ammonia; spores 12-15 µ long; under hardwoods. (2/3)

            Boletus hortonii

            * Cap smooth, dry, very pale tan; pore surface creamy or pale yellow, eventually greenish yellow; stem whitish, smooth; bruising and staining reactions variable but typically faint or absent; cap pale orange with ammonia; spores 9-15 µ long; under hardwoods (if under hemlock see Boletus huronensis, below). (3/3)

            Boletus pallidus

          ~ Not as above. (2/2)

            Note: The mushrooms below are notoriously difficult to separate, and I suspect there are many similar North American boletes that are not included in the literature, which tends to represent boletes found in areas of the continent where bolete specialists (rather than boletes) are distributed.

            * Flesh white. (1/2)

              Cap dry and fairly smooth; pore surface greenish yellow, not bruising; stem pinkish brown with a yellowish base, dry and fairly smooth; flesh staining pinkish when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 9-12 µ long; under hardwoods or conifers; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (1/7)

              Boletus alutaceus

              Cap slimy when fresh, minutely appressed-fibrous; pore surface bright yellow, often bruising dull reddish brown; stem yellow above, pinkish brown below, with tiny yellow fibers near apex, slimy when fresh, smooth; flesh wine colored under the cap skin; cap dark red with ammonia; spores 11-16 µ long; under oaks; southern in distribution. (2/7)

              Boletus auriporus

              Cap slimy when fresh; pore surface bright yellow, bruising brownish; stem yellow, sometimes reddish brown below, slimy when fresh, smooth; flesh not staining when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 11-16 µ long; under hardwoods; southern in distribution. (3/7)

              Boletus gentilis

              Cap dry, granular when young, later smooth; pore surface white becoming yellow, often bruising cinnamon; stem yellow with an orange zone at the apex, longitudinally lined; flesh not staining when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 8-13 µ long; under oaks; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (4/7)

              Boletus roxanae

              Cap dry, smooth or slightly wrinkled; pore surface yellow becoming greenish yellow, not bruising; stem yellowish with reddish colorations, typically covered with tiny dots (reminiscent of the smeared dots in Suillus); flesh sometimes staining bluish when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 11-17 µ long; under hardwoods or conifers; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (5/7)

              Boletus subglabripes

              Cap dry, finely velvety; pore surface yellowish, often bruising greenish, then brownish; stem yellow with reddish brown areas, sometimes rough or with ribs; flesh rarely staining bluish when exposed; cap reddish brown with ammonia; spores 10-15 µ long; under hardwoods or conifers; widely distributed. (6/7)

              Xerocomus subtomentosus

              Cap slimy when young but soon dry, smooth or finely velvety; pore surface yellowish, bruising bluish to grayish; stem reddish brown to yellowish brown, often roughly textured; flesh sometimes staining bluish over the tubes when exposed; cap reddish brown to blackish with ammonia; spores variable, typically 10-14 µ long; under conifers or occasionally under northern hardwoods, sometimes fruiting from decayed wood; northeastern. (7/7)

              Boletus badius

            * Flesh yellow to pale yellow. (2/2)

              Cap slimy when fresh, minutely appressed-fibrous; pore surface bright yellow, often bruising dull reddish brown; stem yellow above, pinkish brown below, with tiny yellow fibers near apex, slimy when fresh, smooth; flesh wine colored under the cap skin; cap dark red with ammonia; spores 11-16 µ long; under oaks; southern in distribution. (1/7)

              Boletus auriporus

              Cap dry, smooth or finely velvety; pore surface yellow becoming olive or brownish yellow, typically bruising greenish or bluish; stem yellow above, whitish below, fairly smooth; flesh usually staining bluish when exposed; cap flashing green, then orange with ammonia; spores 12-15 µ long; under hemlock; northeastern in distribution. (2/7)

              Boletus huronensis

              Cap dry, finely velvety or granular, often finely cracked in age; pore surface yellow, sometimes bruising greenish or bluish; stem yellow above and below, brownish-hairy between; flesh sometimes staining slightly bluish when exposed; cap blue to greenish blue with ammonia; spores 8-14 µ long; under hardwoods, sometimes on decaying wood; southern in distribution. (3/7)

              Boletus hypoxanthus

              Cap dry, smooth or finely velvety; pore surface yellow, not bruising; stem to 1.5 cm thick, tapering to base, yellow, with ribs or lines near apex; flesh not staining when exposed; cap flashing green, then grayish with ammonia; spores 10-14 µ long; under oaks; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (4/7)

              Boletus illudens

              Cap dry, granular when young, later smooth; pore surface white becoming yellow, often bruising cinnamon; stem yellow with an orange zone at the apex, longitudinally lined; flesh not staining when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 8-13 µ long; under oaks; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (5/7)

              Boletus roxanae

              Cap dry, finely velvety; pore surface yellow becoming olive, sometimes bruising greenish or bluish; stem to 2.5 cm thick, equal or somewhat tapered to base, yellowish and whitish below, sometimes with brownish stains, with ribs or lines near apex; flesh sometimes staining bluish when exposed; cap flashing green, then reddish brown with ammonia; spores 10-14 µ long; under hardwoods or conifers; widely distributed. (6/7)

              Xerocomus ferrugineus

              Cap dry, smooth or slightly wrinkled; pore surface yellow becoming greenish yellow, not bruising; stem yellowish with reddish colorations, typically covered with tiny dots (reminiscent of the smeared dots in Suillus); flesh sometimes staining bluish when exposed; cap reaction to ammonia not recorded; spores 11-17 µ long; under hardwoods or conifers; widely distributed east of the Rockies. (7/7)

              Boletus subglabripes



    Cite this page as:

    Kuo, M. (2003, December). Key to Boletus in North America (page nine). Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.Com Web site: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/boletus_09.html


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