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Pinus resinosa (red pine)

Red pine is recognized by a combination of features: the stiff needles, which are bundled in twos and average around 5 inches in length; the small, roundish cones; and the gorgeous mature bark, which features plates of orangish red. The natural range of red pine is a fairly narrow band, the center of which is made up of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence seaway, but the tree is often found in plantations well out of this range, from Kansas to southern Illinois and the Appalachians.

Mushrooms commonly encountered in association with red pine include: Amanita muscaria guessowii; Callistosporium luteo-olivaceum; Cortinarius species; Entoloma vernum; Gyromitra korfii; Gyromitra perlata; Hydnellum species; Hypholoma capnoides; Inocybe species; Laccaria proxima; Lactarius chelidonium; Marasmius pulcherripes; Mycena species; Pycnoporellus alboluteus; Russula species (including R. sanguinea); species of Suillus (including S. acidus, S. brevipes, S. luteus, and S. subalutaceus); Tricholomopsis rutilans; and many others.

 

Range of Pinus resinosa

Pinus resinosa
the bark of red pine is, well, red . . .


Pinus resinosa
needles are bundled in twos, and are usually about 5 inches long

 

Pinus resinosa
despite its large size red pine has a thin, scraggly aspect

 

Pinus resinosa
mature trunk bark develops red plates separated by fissures


Pinus resinosa
seed cones are small and roundish


Pinus resinosa
developing pollen cones

 

Pinus resinosa
mature pollen conest

 

Pinus resinosa
developing seed cone




Kuo, Michael (October, 2022). Pinus resinosa (red pine). Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.com website: www.mushroomexpert.com/trees/pinus_resinosa.html

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